The Future of Our Forests: Join Scott Ferrenberg and RMBL on July 23

Scott-Ferrenberg_crop

Join the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory for “A Science Affair: An evening benefiting the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory” featuring Speaker Scott Ferrenberg on July 23. Ferrenberg is a U.S. Geological Survey ecologist who recently earned his Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from the University of Colorado Boulder. He will discuss “Colorado’s Trees and the Bark Beetles — What Will Our Future Forests Look Like?” as part the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory event on Thursday, July 23 from 6-9 p.m. at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory Community Center in … [Read more...]

Study: Western Forests Decimated by Pine Beetles Not More Likely to Burn

High Park Fire, Colorado 2012, Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture

Western U.S. forests killed by the mountain pine beetle epidemic are no more at risk to burn than healthy Western forests, according to new findings by the University of Colorado Boulder that fly in the face of both public perception and policy. The CU-Boulder study authors looked at the three peak years of Western wildfires since 2002, using maps produced by federal land management agencies. The researchers superimposed maps of areas burned in the West in 2006, 2007 and 2012 on maps of areas identified as infested by mountain pine beetles, according to a CU-Boulder news release. The … [Read more...]

Pine Beetles don’t stick around on slippery bark, says CU-Boulder study

Mountain Pine Beetle

In the online journal Functional Ecology, Doctoral student Scott Ferrenberg and Professor Jeff Mitton of University of Colorado, Boulder describe how they conducted field surveys to determine if mountain pine beetles can successfully attack limber pines with smooth versus rough bark. Scott, who led the study, said he first began to suspect that bark texture might affect the survival of trees while he and Dr. Mitton, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, were walking through a stand of high-elevation limber pines. They noticed that surface resin, a residue of fighting off a beetle … [Read more...]