Replays of webinar series: “Climate Change for Educators”

CU Boulder climate-water webinar

Video replays of the "Climate Change For Educators" webinars are now available. Watch and download the video replays of the webinars which feature climate scientists and water experts from University of Colorado Boulder and USGS. You'll also find the slidedecks from each of the webinars on our SlideShare channel. Two more webinars in Spring 2014 will cover extreme weather attribution and preparedness. We'll be posting details here and in our monthly newsletter so stay tuned! … [Read more...]

Polar Bears & Climate Change

Polar Bear and Cubs

New video of polar bear expert Dr. Ian Stirling's guest lecture at CU Boulder In Spring 2013, Dr. Ian Stirling visited CU-Boulder from Canada to speak about the affects of climate change on polar bears and their ecosystem. We recorded his lecture and are pleased to present the video here: … [Read more...]

New video: Water-Energy Nexus & the Effects of Climate Change

water

Learn More About Climate is pleased to announce the newest in our series of videos featuring climate and natural resource experts from University of Colorado, Boulder. In "The Water-Energy Nexus and Effects of Climate Change," Western Water Assessment Director Kristen Averyt explores the "collision" of water supply vs. energy demands. The production of electricity consumes surprising amounts of water. Much of our water supply is "on call" for future use. How can we reduce our impact on water supply be changing our energy consumption? Averyt answers, … [Read more...]

Like butter: CIRES study explains surprising acceleration of Greenland’s inland ice

Surface meltwater draining through cracks in an ice sheet can warm the sheet from the inside, softening the ice and letting it flow faster, according to a new study by scientists at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder. During the last decade, researchers have captured compelling evidence of accelerating ice flow at terminal regions, or “snouts,” of Greenland glaciers as they flow into the ocean along the western coast. The new CIRES research now shows that the interior regions also are flowing much faster … [Read more...]

A new paper by researchers at Univ. of Washington, CIRES, and NOAA summarizes what is known about the future of the Colorado River

The Colorado River provides water for more than 30 million people in the U.S. West, so water managers have been eager to understand how climate change will affect the river’s flow. But scientific studies have produced an unsettling range of estimates, from a modest decrease of 6 percent by 2050 to a steep drop of 45 percent by then. A new paper by researchers at the University of Washington (UW), CIRES, NOAA and other institutions across the West investigates and explains why those estimates differ and summarizes what is known about the future of this iconic Western river—key … [Read more...]

Water isotopes leave fingerprints for CU climate scientists

University of Colorado meteorologist David Noone and his team are working to understand how water moves around the planet. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the project team observes and analyzes the stable isotope composition of water vapor and precipitation, primarily at the 300-m (984-foot) Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower. The measurements are made using an optical measurement technology which has only recently become available, and which allows continuous in situ observations to be made on a practical basis. The ratio of heavier to lighter isotopes in water … [Read more...]

Researchers take new look at future Colorado River flows

The Colorado River provides water for more than 30 million people in the U.S. West, so water managers have been eager to understand how climate change will affect the river’s flow. But scientific studies have produced an unsettling range of estimates, from a modest decrease of 6 percent by 2050 to a steep drop of 45 percent by then. A new paper by researchers at the University of Washington (UW), CIRES, NOAA and other institutions across the West investigates and explains why those estimates differ and summarizes what is known about the future of this iconic Western river—key … [Read more...]

CU-Boulder video nominated for Emmy

We are thrilled that “Water: A Zero Sum Game” has been nominated by the Heartland Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for an Emmy Award in the “Environment: Program/Feature” category! In the nominated five-minute video, CU-Boulder professor Mark Williams explains how Colorado’s snowpack affects its water supply. Read the press release: At Learn More About Climate, our goal is to provide educators, policy makers and citizens with the most up-to-date climate science research. We present this information in a user-friendly way in order to … [Read more...]

CIRES, NOAA team leads investigation of Southeast air quality, climate questions

Many photographs of the Southeast's Smoky Mountains show layers of tall hills, shading to purples and grays in the distance. Tiny particles in the atmosphere help create the effect, which makes for stunning pictures. But human-caused enhancements of those fine particles also contribute to poor air quality in the Southeastern U.S., and may help explain why the region has not warmed like the rest of the nation. So this summer, scientists from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder, NOAA and colleagues from dozens of other … [Read more...]

In Ancient Ice, Clues That Scientists Are Underestimating Future Sea Levels

The skies do strange things at the NEEM camp, a remote ice-drilling and research facility on the northern Greenland ice sheet. Midnight sunshine. Low clouds of sparkling ice crystals known as "diamond dust." But when rain fell instead of snow last summer, complete with a rainbow arcing over the camp, the NEEM scientists couldn't believe it. "I've been all over that ice sheet, and to have it rain that far north—that's a shock," says James White, a paleoclimatologist at the University of Colorado who led the American team working alongside those from 13 other countries at … [Read more...]