About LMAC

Our Experts

  • Dr. Richard Armstrong Dr. Richard Armstrong Associate Professor of Geography, Adjunct; University of Colorado at Boulder; Fellow at CIRES Dr. Armstrong specializes in remote sensing of snow, ice, and frozen ground; physical and mechanical properties of snow; snow cover and glacier mass/extent as indicators of climate change. Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, 1985
  • Dr. Kristen Averyt Dr. Kristen Averyt Director, Western Water Assessment; Associate Director, CIRES Dr. Averyt assesses the intersection of renewable energy technologies, water availability, and climate change in the West; evaluating decision-making in the context of climate adaptation; and defining processes for engaging users in the development of climate services. Ph.D., Geological and Environmental Science, Stanford University, 2004
  • Dr. Al Bartlett Dr. Al Bartlett (1923-2013) Professor Emeritus of Physics Professor Bartlett was a faculty member at the University of Colorado at Boulder since 1950. Few people have contributed as much over the years to physics education as Professor Bartlett. Dr. Bartlett gave his celebrated lecture, Arithmetic, Population and Energy 1,742 times since September 1969 (average of once every 8.5 days). Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from Harvard University
  • Dr. William Bowman Dr. William Bowman Fellow at INSTAAR; Director of Mountain Research Station; Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Dr. Bowman specializes in plant ecology and the effects of climate change on ecosystems. He also researches biotic control over community and ecosystem properties, resource use by plants, and alpine ecology. He studies how plants, esp. in alpine environments, are reacting to climate change. Ph.D., Duke University, 1988
  • Dr. Maxwell Boykoff Dr. Maxwell Boykoff Assistant Professor, CIRES Dr. Boykoff's primary research areas are (1) issues in the cultural politics of climate change and (2) transformations of carbon-based economies and societies. Ph.D., Environmental Studies from the University of California-Santa Cruz
  • Dr. Lisa Dilling Dr. Lisa Dilling Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies; Fellow at CIRES; Member of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research Dr. Dilling focuses on the use of information in decision making and science policies related to climate change, adaptation, and the carbon cycle. Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1997
  •  Scott Ferrenberg Scott Ferrenberg Doctoral student, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology - University of Colorado Boulder Scott studies local adaptations and evolution, microbial community ecology, and disturbance ecology at the CU-Mountain Research Station. His goal is to understand how adaptations to local conditions will influence interactions among trees and pests as climate change promotes insect range shifts.
  •  Jeff Lukas Jeff Lukas Senior Research Associate, Western Water Assessment - CIRES, University of Colorado Jeff Lukas is a Senior Research Associate at the University of Colorado - Boulder Western Water Policy Program. Jeff's research centers on the use of multi-century tree-ring records to assess past climatic and hydrologic variability in Colorado and the interior West. He has worked with resource managers at the local, state, and federal levels to develop tree-ring reconstructions of streamflow and drought and use them in modeling and planning. He helps resource managers to more effectively incorporate climate information at all time scales-paleoclimate, instrumental records, forecasts, and climate projections-into their planning and operations.
  • Dr. Tom Marchitto Dr. Tom Marchitto Associate Professor of Geological Sciences; Fellow at INSTAAR Dr. Marchitto is a paleoceanographer, studying large-scale changes in ocean circulation and biogeochemistry that occur over orbital, millennial, and shorter timescales. Most of his work has focused on the last full glacial-interglacial cycle, spanning roughly the past 150,000 years. Ph.D., Marine Geology and Geophysics, MIT-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program, 1999
  • Dr. Jeff Mitton Dr. Jeff Mitton Associate Professor of Geological Sciences; Fellow at INSTAAR Professor Mitton's research interests focus on the genetics of natural populations of plants and animals with particular attention to climate change and the mountain pine beetle epidemic. He has worked on marine and freshwater mussels, killifish, trout, mistletoe, bark beetles, pines, aspen, and spruce. Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1973
  •  Deb Morrison Deb Morrison Doctoral student, Curriculum and Science - School of Education, University of Colorado Boulder Deb was a forest ecologist in Canada prior to working as a middle school science teacher in north Denver. Her studies and research work focus on the issue of quality science teachers for urban students, a problem embedded in issues of race, economics, and teacher training.
  •  Cesar Nufio Cesar Nufio Adjoint Curator of Entomology - Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Boulder Cesar is currently an adjoint curator in the Entomology Section of the Museum and has taught several courses in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at CU Boulder. He has coordinated graduate level field courses in Costa Rica for The Organization for Tropical Studies.
  • Dr. Beth Osnes Dr. Beth Osnes Assistant Professor Dance and Performing Arts Dr. Osnes focuses on energy justice using theatre as a tool to include the voices of the energy poor in the planning and implementation of development projects in Panama, Guatemala, India and the Navajo Nation. She has published books and many articles on women's vocal empowerment, mothering, activism, and the performing arts. Ph.D., Theatre, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1992
  • Dr. W. Tad Pfeffer Dr. W. Tad Pfeffer Professor Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering - INSTAAR, University of Colorado Boulder Professor Pfeffer's research areas include the mechanics and dynamics of glaciers and heat and mass transfer in snow. He specializes in glaciology, sea level rise, geophysics, continuum mechanics, fluid mechanics, numerical modeling, photogrammetry. Ph.D., University of Washington, 1987
  • Dr. Ted Scambos Dr. Ted Scambos Senior Research Scientist, Lead Scientist for NSIDC NSIDC Science Team Dr Scambos studies Antarctic glaciology, and is currently investigating environmental change along the Antarctic Peninsula. His work includes glaciology; remote sensing of the poles; climate change effects on the cryosphere; Antarctic history; geochemistry; and planetary science. Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, 1991
  • Dr. Tania Schoennagel Dr. Tania Schoennagel Adjunct Faculty, Geography Department University of Colorado - Boulder; Research Scientist at INSTAAR Dr. Schoennagel specializes in fire ecology and landscape ecology. She studies the causes and consequences of wildfire and insect outbreaks in the West, focusing on fundamental ecological questions with applications to forest management, land-use policy and climate change. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2002
  • Dr. Tim Seastedt Dr. Tim Seastedt Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Fellow at INSTAAR Dr. Seastedt speacializes in drought and agriculture. He studies the interactions between plants, insects, and animals and the physical and chemical properties of the environment, particularly in grassland and tundra ecosystems. Alos, invasive vs. native species under impetus of climate change. Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1979
  • Dr. Mark Serezze Dr. Mark Serezze Director of NSIDC; Research Professor of Geography Dr. Serezze's interests include atmosphere-sea ice interactions, synoptic climatology, boundary layer problems, and climate change. He has conducted field work in the Canadian Arctic on sea ice and icecaps, and on the Alaskan tundra with an increasing focus on the rapid environmental changes being observed in the Arctic. Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, 1989
  • Dr. Andrew Slater Dr. Andrew Slater Research Scientist III, NSIDC Dr. Slater specializes in land-surface and hydrologic modeling of snow, frozen ground, permafrost; hydrologic forecasting and data assimilation. Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, 2003
  •  Amy Steiker Amy Steiker Graduate student, INSTAAR Amy specializes in stable isotope ecology; Biogeochemistry; Nitrogen cycling; Cavity ring-down spectroscopy; Nitrous oxide stable isotopes/isotopomers.
  • Dr. Julienne Stroeve Dr. Julienne Stroeve Research Scientist III NSIDC Dr. Stroeve focuses on remote sensing of snow and ice in the visible, infrared, and microwave wavelengths. Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, 1996
  • Dr. Kathleen Tierney Dr. Kathleen Tierney is director of the Natural Hazards Center, as well as a professor in the Department of Sociology and the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Tierney has served as a member of the National Academies Committee on Disaster Research in the Social Sciences, the Panel on Strategies and Methods for Climate-Related Decision Support, and the Panel on Informing Effective Decisions and Actions Related to Climate Change. She is currently a member of the National Academies Committee to Advise the U. S. Global Change Research Program.
  •  Brad Udall Brad Udall Director of the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and Environment University of Colordao Law School Brad's expertise includes hydrology and related policy issues of the American West. He has written extensively on the impacts of climate change on water resources in the American West.
  • Dr. Tom Veblen Dr. Tom Veblen Professor Geography, EEBIO Dr. Veblen's main research interests are in forest ecology and vegetation dynamics in relation to natural and anthropogenic disturbances, especially as related to climate variability. He uses tree rings to date past disturbance events such as fire and insect outbreaks. Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1975
  • Dr. James White Dr. James White Director, INSTAAR; Professor of Geology and Environmental Studies Dr. White's specific areas of research include studying the global carbon cycle, both modern and in the past, and reconstructing past environmental conditions using ice cores. He is working now on new deep ice cores in Greenland and Antarctica. He was one of the first scientists to identify abrupt climate changes that typify large climate shifts on our planet. He is an author of over one hundred peer-reviewed publications, and is a highly cited author in the geosciences. Ph.D., Columbia University, 1983
  • Dr. Mark W. Williams Dr. Mark W. Williams Director, Colorado Water and Energy Research Center; Professor of Geography; Fellow at INSTAAR Dr. Williams specializes in understanding water (where it comes from and where it goes), snow science, groundwater and energy; water supply from mountain regions. He's currently heading up a study on how much water comes from High Asian glaciers. Ph.D., Biological Sciences with an emphasis in ecology from the University of California at Santa Barbara, 1991